RAILFAN GUIDES of the U.S.

 

RAILROAD STATIONS, TOWERS, TUNNELS, BRIDGES, etc
IN COLORADO

Arrow
Boulder
Cannon City
Castle Rock
Colorado Springs
Denver
Durango
Glenwood Springs
Gore Canyon
Grand Junction
Idaho Springs
La Junta
Loveland
Montrose
Pikes Peak
Pueblo
Royal Gorge
Salida
Sterling
Trinidad

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Most of the postcards were found on EBay unless noted.  Dates are in the picture title, x means the date is approximate.  1901a and 1910b would be the same card, both sides.   Some of them have been cleaned up and/or repaired when I had the energy.  This page is mostly for historical reference, as MANY of these stations are not around anymore!   What's the difference between a station and a depot?  Most people will say "nuttin", it's a matter of preference, although many will use depot for older buildings.  If they were available, and interesting, I included the back side of the postcards.

ARROW





BOULDER

 



CANON CITY







CASTLE ROCK

 





COLORADO SPRINGS

 







DENVER

GPS Coordinates: 39.753224, -105.000284
Obviously, the largest number of postcards around are for this depot.....

The following is from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denver_Union_Station

Original structures:  Denver's first train station was constructed in 1868 to serve the new Denver Pacific Railway, which connected Denver to the main transcontinental line at Cheyenne WY.  By 1875, there were four different railroad stations, making passenger transfers between different railroad lines inconvenient.  To remedy this issue, theUnion Pacific Railroad proposed creating one central "Union Station" to combine the various operations.  In February 1880, the owners of the four lines (the Union Pacific, the Denver & Rio Grande Western, the Denver, South Park & Pacific, and the Colorado Central) agreed to build a station at 17th and Wynkoop Streets.  Architect A. Taylor of Kansas City was hired to develop the plans and the station opened in May 1881.

However, a fire that started in the women's restroom in 1894 destroyed the central portion of the 1881 depot.  The Kansas City architectural firm of Van Brunt & Howe was hired to design a larger replacement depot in the Romanesque Revival style.  Both the 1881 and 1894 depots included a tall central clock tower with four clock faces.

Early 20th century:  On July 4, 1906, a large arch known as the Mizpah Arch was dedicated in front of the station in order to provide a threshold for travelers entering and leaving the city.  Constructed at a cost of $22,500 with 70 tons of steel and over 2,000 light bulbs, the arch originally featured the word "Welcome" on both sides.  However, the elevation facing 17th Street was changed to "Mizpah", a Hebrew word expressing an emotional bond between separated people, and used as a farewell to people leaving Denver.

In 1912, the original Union Depot partnership was dissolved and replaced by the Denver Terminal Railway Company, representing the then-major operators of the station (the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe, the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific, the Colorado & Southern, the Union Pacific, and the Denver & Rio Grande Western railways).  The new partnership decided to demolish and rebuild the central portion of the station to handle the increasing passenger traffic.  The new central portion, designed by Denver architects Gove & Walsh, was built in the Beaux-Arts style and opened in 1914.

By the 1920s and 1930s, over 80 trains served the station daily with notable dignitaries such as Queen Marie of Romania, Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt arriving to Denver through the station.  As a result of growing passenger service, the Mizpah Arch in front of the station was deemed a traffic hazard and was torn down in 1931.

Late 20th century -- Decline: Although World War II saw a surge in rail traffic, the latter half of the 20th century saw a sharp decline in service for Union Station and countless other train stations in the United States as competition began to grow from automobiles and airlines.  For the first time in 1958, passenger traffic at Stapleton International Airport exceeded that of Union Station.  It was during this period that the orange "Union Station: Travel by Train" signs were placed on both sides of the building in order to advertise intercity rail travel.








The above photo is part of a picture found on the Wikipedia page for Union Station.  Looking down 17th Street, from 1908.  Love the detail!







 





 

 

 

 





DURANGO

 



GLENWOOD SPRINGS

 



GORE CANYON - Denver & Salt Lake RR

From 1925, found on EBay.....  Tunnel???



GRAND JUNCTION



 



IDAHO SPRINGS





LA JUNTA





LOVELAND





MONTROSE  - Denver, Rio Grand &Western Depot

  From around 1910



PIKES PEAK











PUEBLO







 



ROYAL GORGE

 



SALIDA





STERLING









TRINIDAD





Disclaimers:

Pictures and additional information is always needed if anyone feels inclined to take 'em, send 'em, and share 'em, or if you have something to add or correct.... credit is always given! BE NICE!!!

Contact info is here


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New 4-27-2013
Last Changed: 25-Jul-2016