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Playing with trains is fun, playing with bigger and bigger trains gets increasingly more fun.  Take the hobby of Live Steam and Live Diesels.  It doesn't get much better unless you own a real railroad. 

One of the best examples of the hobby is Russ Eldridge's White Creek Railroad just north of Grand Rapids Michigan, where he has approximately seven miles of track.  What makes Russ' track interesting is that he has track going all over the place, and it's not just a big loop, thereby providing engineers with multiple opportunities to maximize their fun..... Just watch out for those crossovers!..... :-)  The picture at the top of the page was taken there in 2007.

One other railroad that stands out from the others is Train Mountain in Oregon.  They hold the record for the largest "model" railroad in the Guinness Book of Records, with 70,000 feet of mainline (13 1/4 miles), and a total of 133,250 feet (25 1/4 miles).

Anyone have pictures to share?   Please send em on in, my email is here

Below are some of the places I have had a chance to visit.  I've also been to the Los Angeles Live Steamers and the live steam group in Roanoke, many, many years ago before they moved, someday I will scan the slides.


 









Signal Aspects for Train Mountain in Oregon
Building a 1/8 scale New York City R-33 Subway Car

Note: The pages for Junction Valley and the Traverse Steam Train are part of my railfan guide series.  While the Junction Valley/Bridgeport page is 100% JV, the Traverse Steam Train part of that page is just a small part of the guide to the area.


Links and Additional Information

The Live Steam hobby is a great hobby, regardless of the scale you decide to involve yourself in.  Here are some more links of places you can go for more information and inspiration:

I don't know why, but it seems to me that guys in the UK have more "iron" or something in their blood, cause they sure do have some great railroading over there, and the Live Steam scene is no exception.  For a good place to start, check out Peter's website: http://www.miniaturerailwayworld.co.uk/

A page of links by the Friends of Train Mountain: http://www.friendstm.org/Clubs/AllClubsUSA.shtml

Good all around source of info, and great sales page: http://www.discoverlivesteam.com/

A page of links by RailServe, including manufacturers of supplies and equipment: http://www.railserve.com/Models/Live_Steam/Suppliers/

Suppliers

Here are just a few, as there are many:

http://mountaincar.intuitwebsites.com/  One of the premier gas/hydraulic locomotive manufacturers of 1/8 scale stuff, located in Salem VA

http://www.mdmlocomotiveworks.com/  Large offering of 1/8 scale gas/hydraulic locos

http://ridetrains.net/p1.htm  Inexpensive way to start in the hobby!

http://www.plumcovestudios.com/index2.html  Another easy way to break into the 1/8 scale hobby

http://www.discoverlivesteam.com/forsale/1_braun/index.htm  A Hobby Foundry, all sorts of castings

http://www.surpluscenter.com/Hydraulic.htm  Want to roll your own hydraulic system, here is a source for formulas

http://www.easyhandlingcompany.com/OutdoorTrains/OutdoorTrains.html  Another source for 1/8 scale gas/hydraulic locos

http://thetrainworks.com/  1/8 scale locos available in either gas/hydraulic or electric

http://www.epstores.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=2  Ties, rails n stuff to build your railroad with

http://www.herringengineer.com/  Custom designed equipment

http://www.mr-motion.net/  Mr Motion, another inexpensive way to enter the hobby

http://www.precisionsteelcar.com/  Cast detail parts

http://www.cocolamuscreektrolleyco.com/Welcome.html  Handcrafted 1/8 scale trolleys

http://discoverlivesteam.com/forsale/MorrisRR/index.htm  Morris RR supply, famous for their 1/8 scale gas powered SW-1500's!
 



Disclaimers:

I love trains, and I love signals.  I am not an expert.  I do these pages because I love spending my time doing them - although I do a reasonable amount of research to make sure the information presented is accurate! :-)  :-)

Please Note:  Since the main focus of my two websites is railroad signals, the railfan guides are oriented towards the signal fan being able to locate them.  For those of you into the modeling aspect of our hobby, myindexa page has a list of almost everything railroad oriented I can think of to provide you with at least a few pictures to help you detail your pike.

If this is a railfan page, every effort has been made to make sure that the information contained on this map and in this railfan guide is correct.  Once in a while, an error may creep in, oooooooops, oh well! :-)

My philosophy: Pictures and maps are worth a thousand words, especially for railfanning.  Text descriptions only get you so far, especially if you get lost or disoriented.  Take along good maps.... a GPS is OK to get somewhere, but maps are still better if you get lost!  I belong to AAA, which allows you to get local maps for free when you visit the local branches.  ADC puts out a nice series of county maps for the Washington DC area, but their state maps do not have the railroads on them.  If you can find em, I like the National Geographic map book of the U.S..... good, clear, and concise graphics, and they do a really good job of showing you where tourist type attractions are, although they too lack the railroads.  Other notes about specific areas will show up on that page if known.

BTW, floobydust is a term I picked up 30-40 years ago from a National Semiconductor data book, and means miscellaneous and/or other stuff.

Pictures and additional information is always needed if anyone feels inclined to take 'em, send 'em, and share 'em, or if you have something to add or correct.... credit is always given! BE NICE!!! Contact info is here Beware: If used as a source, ANYTHING from Wikipedia must be treated as being possibly being inaccurate, wrong, or not true.

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NEW 09/24/2007
Last Modified:  05-Dec-2016